Category Archives: Photography

Duchesnay Falls North Bay

Happy New Year everyone.This is my first blog for 2011.2010 was a successful year blogging as I had over a 1000 views to my blog.I want to thank everyone for visiting and to continue to do so.

I am not much into photographing during the winter.My free time is taken up cutting firewood for next winter.I also spend the winter printing out select photos for upcoming shows and displays.

I had the opportunity to spend some time at Duchesnay Falls located just West of North Bay. My wife Maureen and I were heading for Southern Ontario for a week long visit with friends in Newtonville . We left home early Monday morning the 27 September 2010. It was a cloudy day when we arrived at Duchesnay Falls.The time was about 10 am.

Duchesnay Falls offers a 3 km trail that makes a loop.This is a very picturesque location,especially in the Fall.I parked in the parking lot and Maureen decided that she would get some shut eye well I photographed. Grabbing my camera gear I picked up the trail and headed along the waterway.My first site was a picnic table being used by someone.The person had a tarp over the table and was curled up under it in a sleeping bag.

This made me a little nervous in regards to my wife back at the truck.I thought well I am not going to be that long so I continued on my hike.There was not full Fall color but enough to enrich my photos.There was a fair amount of water cascading down and Being a cloudy day I was a little concerned about getting fast enough shutter speed and maintaining my f11 f-stops.The above photo was shot at the upper end of the falls with a zoom setting of 65 mm.The shutter speed  was set at 0.5 sec @ f22.I used the colorful leaves to frame the top part of the photo .The rushing water creates a curved line with flow in and flow out.The rocks give added depth.The one thing I had to watch out for was too much foam in the water.

 

I was able to capture the above scene by creating an S-curve with the running water.The colorful leaves and evergreens added  color and depth to my photo.You will notice that the water is a tea color that is common in Northern Ontario.I took this photo with a zoom setting of 41 mm.The shutter speed was set at 0.6 sec @ f29.I was able to capture a wonderful depth with this shot.Again the water flows from the top of the photo to the bottom of the photo.

The last photo was taken of one of the waterfalls on the Duchesnay water system.The waterfalls was a fairly decent drop and I wanted a tight shot with the leaves creating a frame.I set this shot up so that I had rocks in the foreground to created depth .The zoom was set at 44 mm.The shutter speed  was at 1/5 sec @ f22.

I returned to the truck and Maureen was still asleep.I saw no signs of the person that was sleeping under the picnic table as I didn’t pass that way on my return.There was a couple more cars in the parking lot now.

This is a worth while trip to Duchesnay Falls where many photographic opportunities await you.I will be going back next Fall when the the leaves are in full color.I was a week too early. So until next time happy trails.

 

 

Creatively With Water

One of the things I really love doing is look for patterns in running water as I walk along a river or creek.The photo above was taken at the top end of a waterfalls.For this type of shot you need fairly fast water and a bright overcast day.The water is tumbling over the rocks in three different directions here.I chose a composition at an angle to the flow so the water would exit out on the bottom left corner of the photo.So basically you have the water running in from both sides and the top.This will give you flow in and flow out.The secret here is in the shutter speed as while maintaining depth of field.

Once the camera and tripod are set up I will shot the scene at different exposures.I may take up to 20 exposures so that I can  select the photo that I will use when I get home.You want to create defining patterns with the water.Shooting at 1 sec or so will not achieve the results we are looking for as you would create water that has no detail.This photo that I selected was shot at a shutter speed of  1/4 sec at f22.You will see that the flowing water has character and depth.

As I was walking along above the river I noticed the unique patterns been created by a group of rocks in the river.The river was very low at this time of year.The water depth was very shallow.I found my way down to the river’s edge and set up the camera and tripod to create this composition.The lighting was extremely beautiful that evening and everything had a wonderful glow.

I used the rock on the left for a lead in and the water flows from the top left to the bottom right.I shot this one at 1o secs at f29.There was some very nice patterns created by the water flowing around the small rocks. Again I shot at different shutter speeds to create the patterns I wanted.

You will not see these type of effects too often,but when you do start shooting.You must also picture in your mind what it will look like in Photoshop.Until next time happy trails.

The Unexpected Shot

A couple weeks ago on a Monday,I headed up the Westbranch North of Webbwood to do some photographing.My destination was about 80 km up the Westbranch to a couple of lakes that I had been exploring this Fall.

These lakes are surrounded by Jack Pine and White Pine so bare deciduous trees are not an issue here.I was interested in one small lake that had an interesting cliff face that I have made a number of attempts to photograph without success.

Upon arrival I loaded up my gear and picked up the trail along the lake.This is a very small lake nestled down in between a series of hills.It was now about 11:30 in the morning. While I was walking towards the cliff face I noticed out of the corner of my eye a display of some beautiful lighting highlighting the evergreens along the shoreline. I set up my camera and tripod and composed a vertical shot using the small rock point as my focal point.At this time of year,mid November the sun is low to the horizon allowing for this kind of lighting at mid day.There was mist over the water to add atmosphere.There was a nice reflection on the water to add depth to the photo.I focused on the rock then I composed the shot.The zoom lens was set at 135 mm with the shutter at 0.5 sec @f22.

The above shot was taken in the same location as the first shot.I was attracted by the lighting on the far trees creating a nice lighting pattern and reflecting into the water.The sun always creates a beautiful gold color when it highlights evergreens.The zoom was set to 100 mm an d the shutter speed to 0.4 sec @f22. This allowed me to create a nice peaceful mood.

I never did get my shot of the the cliff.Oh well next time.Before I go I want to thank everyone who has visited my blog as I have now surpassed a 1000 hits.This is a milestone for me.So for now happy trails.

Close To Home 2

Paul Smith and I decided to drive to the far end of Bass Lake and do some exploring.Parking our trucks off the main road we gathered up our gear.We followed a trail along the shore line looking for photo opportunities. As we walked along the shore I noticed a point of land that was lit up by sunlight from behind and causing a very colorful scene.In the backdrop of the hillside was a awesome display of lighting to create this spectacular scene.

There was a slight breeze blowing that created a painting like effect on the reflection in the water.I shot this photo with a zoom setting of 132 mm and the shutter speed at 1/10 sec @f22. The sun was getting low in the sky and the wind was creating some problems.One problem we had was that we were by a beaver house. An adult beaver kept swimming back and forth in front of us disturbing the water.Needless to say along with wind and beaver waves,the water was not getting calm.We made it to the end of the lake and came upon private property.It was now getting dark.We hiked back to the trucks and called it a day.

Until next time happy trails

Close To Home.

Paul Smith and I were having a conversation one day as we were heading out on one of our adventures.Paul mentioned that I should check out Bass Lake about 10 minutes from home.This mid size lake is surrounded by broad-leafed trees that would add some very nice fall colors.

A couple weeks later my Mother drove in and asked if I would take her to Lively so she could do some banking.As we were driving I thought that I would go and check out this Bass Lake on the way back home. Returning from Lively I drove off of Highway 17 onto the Fairbanks Road.This road will take you directly to Fairbanks Provincial Park on Fairbanks Lake.When we neared  Bass Lake I noticed the far shoreline had a lot of color yet and the wind was minimal.I then decided to head home and gather up the camera gear.

Upon reaching home I called up Paul and told him That I was heading to Bass Lake for a photo shoot.Paul told me he would meet me there but would be a few minutes late.I gathered up the camera gear and Mother said she was going for a nap.I arrived at Bass Lake in short order.One thing I notice was there was heavy traffic on this road.There was also a fair amount of heavy trucks hauling on the road.

I proceeded to set the camera and tripod up on the shoulder of the road,mindful of the oncoming traffic. The lake came up to the road here so there was not much room to setup.I decided quickly to do a Pano here.There was and old building on a rock point with a door leaning on the building’s front wall.Yellow leaves highlighted by the sun  was the predominant color behind the building .Looking to the right I noticed a cottage showing through the trees.I did not want to include this cottage but saw a nice small Maple tree glowing red.That would me my right anchor.I then proceed to take four overlapping shots.I kept the shots fairly tight as to show no sky and just enough reflection to add color and detail to the composition.The water was just calm enough to create that painted effect on the colored reflections in the water.

Paul showed up about 15 minutes later.By this time lighting effect was gone.The zoom was set at 135 mm with a shutter speed of 1/13 sec @ f11. Next week I will continue with this close to home adventure as we explored around the lake.Until then happy trails

Bog Island

Small lakes and bogs can created interesting subject material.With that said Paul Smith and I have found such a location to photograph.I had previously photographed this little island before.If you go back a couple post you will see the same island.

This time I captured the island at a different angle.I set the tripod up half way down a slight incline and waited as the lighting changed.As I watched the various light beams I was also aware of the sun’s angle as it was setting to the West.It would not be long before the sun would shine into the lense.

As the sun lowered it began highlighting parts of the island shoreline and backlit the trees beautifully.I now had a problem with the sun glare in the lense.Using my ball cap to fend of the glare I captured this wonderful exposure.The lighting highlighted the reddish growth along the island shoreline.The deadheads added character to the photo with a ghostly affect. With so much light on the island the background was darker,consisting of dark green evergreens that are common to this part of the country.

This photo was taken with a zoom setting of 120 mm and the shutter at 0.4 f22.I was forced to to tight crop this shot with only a bit of reflection in the water due to the lake surface not being calm.This was another case of having to go back a number of times due to unsatisfactory conditions and just waiting.

In the end it is well worth it,so till next time,Happy Trails.

Hiking The Crack

My photographic partner Paul Smith had been after me for some time to take a hike up to the Crack in Killarney Provincil Park.Back on October 11 I picked up Paul and we met Gary Leclair at the South End Canadian Tire parking lot in Sudbury. We load our gear into Gary’s mini van and headed to Killarney Provincial Park.Gary parked the van in the parking lot.

This is a very popular Provincial Park were the hiking trails are numerous.There are a lot of people taking advantage of this beautiful part of Northern Ontario to get out and go for a hike on scenic trails.

The three of us picked up the trail and started walking through a maple and birch grove of brightly colored leaves.Along the way I noticed a pond on our left.We made our way down to the pond.The wind was calm and being cloudy the lighting was very good.The first thing I saw was the small cliff face at the end of the pond.The rocks here are white quartzite that gleam.I set up the tripod and composed a shot by adding a small rock and a piece of wood reflecting in the water on the right.You will also notice evergreens on the right.I now had a lead in to the rock.There were a lot of bare trees now with no leaves so I kept the left side tight. The splash of orange and red on the cliff really brought out the picture.

I shot the above scene with a shutter speed of 0.4 sec @f22.The zoom was at 56.0 mm.

Looking around me I spotted this little island of moss and grass.There were these smallish reddish plants growing among the grass.You will also observe a group of white flowers growing here.The lighting was extraordinary and I set up the shot that you see above.The zoom was set at 135 mm with a shutter speed of 0.6 sec @ f22.

The three of us finished up shooting and we continued up the trail.We met numerous people hiking out and finally we approached the Crack.This is a split in the rock face that you have to climb to make the top.This last part of the hike consists of climbing up and over boulders.Your reward is an awesome panoramic view of lakes and the La Cloche Mountains before your eyes.I did not take any photos here as most of the hills were bare of color now.I will most certainly will be back next Fall.I have talked Paul into exploring the lakes below us next summer.

This a one and a half hour hike to the top of the crack.I enjoyed meeting Gary and hope to be in touch in the near future for another advendure.

For more info on Killarney Provincial Park you can check out there website

http://www.ontarioparks.com/english/kill.html

Paul Smith’s website is here so check it out too.

http://paulsmithphotography.ca/

So until next time happy trails

 

Persistance Pays off.

It was the past Friday that Paul Smith and I came across some new locations up the Westbranch North of Webbwood.We were now 90 km up the Westbranch and exploring new country.The moose hunters were setting up there camps getting ready for the opening of moose season on Saturday.It was a sunny day,but the wind was creating havoc and towards sundown was still blowing.It was scratch day one.

The next day I headed back up alone early that afternoon.When I arrived on location the wind was blowing pretty good.I waited til late evening but to no avail.I headed back home again with no photos.Sunday came and being my youngest grand son’s birthday, I stopped off at my son’s apartment to enjoy the BBQ and wish  the little man a happy birthday.He was 1 year old.I hadn’t been on the Internet for a week as I had left my usb modem down South well we were visiting. I logged on an checked my email . My good friend Jan Winthers had emailed me earlier saying he was available for the weekend to go out photographing.I gave Jan a quick call and asked him if he could meet me in an hour.

I met up with Jan and we transferred his photo equipment to my truck. As we were driving up the Westbranch Jan realized that he had forgot his tripod. We have all forgotten something at one time or another. The third day turned out to be a blessing with the wind cooperating for a change.

Late fall brings with it much more subdued colors as the grass and ferns turn brown and rusty red.I myself like this time of year for the challenges it offers.Jan and I were walking along a small lake when we spotted a little island across the way. There was some very interesting lighting come from the side onto the island.The evergreens had wonderful lighting filtering through to break up the dark mass in the background.This creates a background with more detail .The gray color of the dead branches give character to the trees along with the remaining tree growth being highlighted by the sun.Take in the brownish shoreline and you have a very earth tone photo. There is enough reflection in the water to create depth.

I shot this scene with the zoom set at 100 mm and a shutter speed of  0.4 sec @ f 22. You must always be watching for unique lighting and color patterns.

Moving along the shoreline I was attracted by the lighting and colors that you can observe in the above photo. The clump of reddish brown grass was nicely lit by the sun.Light was filtering through the trees in the background creating lovely reflective patterns along with a beam of light hitting the reddish brown grass along the shoreline.I positioned my tripod to put the island of grass in the foreground and the lighted grass on the shoreline in the background.The idea here is to have the reddish brown grasses stand out.

I shot the above photo with a zoom setting 135 mm.The shutter speed was set at 0.5 sec @ f22.

Jan and I had a wonderful day together and I am looking forward to our next outing. Until next time happy trails.

Adverse Weather

A couple days ago the phone rang and it was my good friend Paul Smith calling.He asked if I would be interested in going out to do some photographing.I never turn down an invitation to head out and get some photos.

The day was cloudy with various lighting situations and some showers.The clouds were moving very quickly.We headed up the Westbranch to a locale that I had previously taken a very nice photo.Upon arrival I headed to the river that ran along side the road.The first thing that happened was that I took a tumble on the rocks.These rocks get very slippery when they are wet.

I half crawled down the rocks looking for my previous photo location.I looked behind me and saw a beautiful scene before me.I quickly set up the camera and tripod and took the composition you see above.The sun sent a beam of light on the trees in the background and the reflection was gorgeous.When the rocks are wet the colors come alive.The mist gives that added touch.This shot was taken in the middle of the afternoon by the way.It is not often you get mist at that time of day.I did find my previous location but was unable to get any decent shots as the mist got too heavy to photograph.

I shot the above scene with a zoom setting of 85 mm and the shutter set at 1/10 sec @ f22.The mist got too heavy to photograph and I find that I then have trouble focusing automatically and manually.Is this the difference between a 800.00 camera and a 3000.00 camera?I will be upgrading in the future.

We decided to head back and go up  the main road.By now the sky had cleared and the sun was shining.I was driving along and Paul said stop.He had noticed light reflecting on some rocks on a creek through the trees.I parked the truck and gathering up our gear we hiked into the creek.When we got there we saw a beam of light on some vegetation across the creek.I set the camera and tripod and took the photo you see below.

The rocks were pinkish and everything was still on the wet side to bring out the colors.I put a rock to the left in the photo to lead your eye into the photo following the shoreline and the clump of grass helps provide depth and breaks up the water.The beam of light adds that little extra touch to the photo.

This photo was taken with a zoom setting of 85 mm and a shutter speed of 3.2 sec @ f32.When you see light beams like this you had better be quick and get the shot as the lighting can go very fast.In this case the light lasted about 5 minutes as cloud cover moved in.These are the type of shots that requires a little luck and you must recognize that there is a photo to be taken.You also must compose on the fly with out thinking to capture the lighting.

Until next time,happy trails.

Capturing The Light

My photographic partner,Paul Smith and I unloaded the canoe in to the Aux Sauble River North of Massey at the 3 mile mark.We proceeded to paddle up river and we worked our way up to a small waterfalls and unloaded the canoe on a sandbar on the opposite shoreline.Paul elected to stay at the waterfalls and I proceeded upriver looking for photographic opportunities.Looking back down river I noticed a bit of a haze as the day was hot and muggy.

As I walked upstream I noticed a beam of sunlight highlighting the grass and ferns near the waters edge.The scene was on the opposite shore of the river.The time was getting on late afternoon and creating heavy shadows on the far shore.The sun also sets in that direction.I quickly set up and shot the scene that you see above.The dark background brings out the foreground and the reflections in the water.The dark background also helps eliminate clutter.It also helps to keep the shot tightly composed.

I photographed the composition with a zoom setting of 135 and the shutter speed at 0.6 sec and f25.

I continued walking upstream and I noticed some unique lighting ahead of me that you see in the photo above.The problem was that the background was very dark and the right shoreline was brightly lit.I set up the camera and tripod and created the composition you see above.I set the exposure for the sandbar and took a photo and then I took a exposure on the background and took a photo at that setting.This allowed me to bring both photos into Photoshop and achieve what I was looking for.

At this time it was getting late and walking further upstream was getting harder going.I had covered about a mile and a half.I retraced my steps back downstream and met Paul at the waterfalls.

We loaded the canoe and drifted back down river enjoying the stillness and quiet of the woods.Beaver were swimming ahead of  and Paul heard twiggs snapping beside us up in the bush.We stopped paddling and listened for a few moments but nothing happened.It was dark by the time we got back to the truck and headed home.

It was a great afternoon and evening enjoying the wilderness and getting a quality photo or two in the process an added bonus.As you can see I am always watching for interesting lighting situations.This only can happen if you spend a lot of time observing what is happening around you.

So until next time happy trails.