Tag Archives: Paul Smith

The Nature of Light

Killarney0059Print

This photo was taken on a small creek that runs out of Johnny  Lake in Killarney Provincial Park. My partner, Paul Smith and I were exploring along the creek. As we made our way through wooded growth to the shoreline , I suddenly noticed the strong glow of lighting on the grasses and trees. Now there was cloud cover moving overhead rather quickly. This meant the sunlight came and went. It was late afternoon so the angle of light was right. Moving quickly I set up my tripod and Canon 7D at the creeks edge. Due to the large amount of green and yellow I kept the reflections to a minimum. The dead wood broke up the mass of green on the right. There is shadow in the background and the creek takes a bend. It was a matter of waiting for the sun to pop out from behind the moving clouds. This photo shows you what the right lighting can do to your composition. Normally this would be just an ordinary shot.

Well that is it for this week. I thank you all who came for a visit. I would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone and there families a Merry Christmas, especially the little ones. The campfire is beckoning and the tea is ready. So until next time happy trails

Morning on The Manitou

The Manitou River starts its journey at the South end of Lake Manitou on Manitoulin Island,Ontario.Manitoulin Island is the largest fresh water island in the world.The Manitou River is approximately 15 km long,The river ends at Michaels Bay on the South side of Manitoulin Island into Lake Huron.I had previously explored the Manitou River the evening before.I had determined that the best shot was to be had in the early morning.

Paul Smith and I arrived on location before daybreak and set up our photo equipment.It was a great morning.This portion of the river forms a S shape.With that in mind I placed the cedar tree at the top of the photo for depth.The sun actually lit up this tree first.The real bonus was when he morning light highlighted the clump of grass on the shore giving off a yelow orange effect plus a bit of reflection.You never know what you will get at times.There was mist on the river that morning.As time progressed a beam of light started on the right hand side of the photo.As I waited the beam of light slowly made its way to the left.The composition was slowly coming togrther.The last piece of the composition occured when the water turned golden in the foreground.After that happened the highlights on the water got too harsh.Now I took approximately 40 shots of this location.I used the second last shot to get the composition you see above.

That is it for now.Thank you for stopping by.So until next time happy trails.

O S A Lake Part 4

Paul Smith and I awoke to the sound of wind in the trees.Every once in a while the wind would buffet the tent.There would be no photographing this morning.It was Friday morning and we were to depart home. Dressing and crawling out of the tent,we were met by a wind that had shifted into the West during the night.After a leisure breakfast and a hot coffee,we packed our gear for the trip out.Paul and I had decided to try the shorter portage over to Killarney Lake.Pushing the canoe from shore we were able to go with the wind.The islands sort of sheltered us from the wind until we hit open water.The rollers were now going past us and there was some white-caps.The canoe was moving at a good clip and before long we were at the portage.

Packing over was quick and before long we were on our way again.The bay here was calm.In a couple minutes we arrived at a small beaver dam that we hauled over and were on our way.The portage over to Freeland Lake was soon spotted and we arrived shortly there after.While loading our gear into the canoe,a kayak approached and Paul and I had a good chat with a gentleman from the French River area.He was day tripping over to Killarney Lake.

Pushing off,we paddled into the wind now.The velocity was low-keyed here.Paddling steady we made good time to George Lake.As we approached the West end of Freeland Lake,four heads popped up beside us.They were a family of Otter checking us out to see who the intruders were.This was Paul and myself s first sighting of Otters.We had also observed Loons on the way out.The young were gray and almost adult size.The adult loons were just starting to change.

At the final portage there were a number of folks carrying over to Freeland Lake.Talking to these folks I asked about the conditions on George Lake.I was told we had our work cut out for us.Paul had met a couple having lunch so I think we spent also an hour chatting to them.It was now time to find out what was in store for us.

As we rounded the first point the full force of the wind hit us.The waves were high enough and at times there were rollers.Every once in a while there would be a strong gust of wind that stopped us in our tracks.With some hard stokes we finally made it into the bay to the landing.The Explorer was quickly loaded and we were on our way home.Another good trip in the books.

The composition above was taken Thursday night at the West end of O S A Lake.It was close to dark when I happened along.I was intruded by what I saw.There is just enough Fall color to tell the time of year.In the background is the flat rock surface of the La Cloche Mountains on the North side of O S A Lake.By utilizing the various points and islands I created a path for your eye to follow into the background.Thus this photo was created.The reflections were kept minimal.You can see scrub oak on the rock face.They are a reddish brown.

While that is it until next week.It is now time to photograph Tamarack as they change colors.So until next time happy trails.

O S A Lake Part 3

By now after a day and a half of rain,dampness along with cool temperatures the weather cleared up.It was now late Thursday afternoon.It is always interesting to watch the grey clouds moving past you and then you spot some blue sky.Within an hour the sky had cleared and the wind had switched to the West.Now it was just a matter of waiting for the evening light and hopefully the wind would calm down.O S A Lake is a large lake prone to windy conditions.I cooked up a meal of Uncle Ben’s rice and canned meat.A nice hot cup of tea to end the meal and we were ready to photograph.

Paul Smith and I had some decent photographing that evening,but you had to watch the wind.In the more open water the wind did not settle down.I captured the above scene on the South side of the island we camped on.I loved the rock structure the protruded out into the lake for its detail.I had photographed this same scene in June.But now I had Fall color and the water level was down considerably since June.Thus exposing more rock structure.There was an old length of a tree jutting into the lake.I put it into the bottom right of the picture.For once I had some decent cloud patterns.

At this time of year darkness comes early.Paul built up a fire and we enjoyed its warmth for a few hours.You could feel the air cooling down now and tomorrow we head home.Thank you everyone for your comments and coming for a visit.Until next time happy trails.

An Evening on O S A Lake

As the evening faded to twilight the lake surface became mirror like,creating beautiful reflections.The lighting was wonderful creating highlights here and there.Clouds appeared to the North East.There was a cast of color on the Eastern horizon.

I added shoreline along with a Juniper bush to the foreground to add to the depth of the composition.As Paul Smith and I were photographing we observed two large flocks of Canada Geese flying overhead.We estimated that there was close to 175 geese in the two flocks.We were able to observe them morning and evening as they passed over the lake.

Dusk finally arrived.The mosquitoes were humming around us by now. It was time to retire for the night.Hopefully the wind will still be calm at daybreak.

Well that is it for this week.So until next time happy trails.

 

O S A Lake Spring

Wednesday morning,clear blue sky and warm temperatures.I pulled into Paul Smith’s yard.Having loaded Paul’s gear in we were soon on the road.We stopped in Lively for gas and a Tim Horton‘s coffee and were soon driving down Hwy 69 to Killarney Provincial Park.

I pulled into the parking lot at the main entrance to the Park.Entering the Park office we were met by Kris Puhvel executive director for Friends of Killarney.We had a brief chat with Kris,then obtaining our camp permits we headed out.We were informed that there was a fire ban in effect.

We quickly loaded our gear into the canoe and were on our way to the East end of George Lake.As we approached the portage into Freeland Lake a yearling black bear was sitting on the shore among the grass observing us,minding his own business.Unloading the  canoe we proceeded to carry our gear over the short portage.As I was walking a good size water snake crossed in front of me into the water. On my return trip I spotted a male Hummingbird on the ground.I placed the colorful little fella in the palm of my hand and looking him over did not see any damage and he was alive.I  then placed him in the shade of a tree while Paul sprinkled water around him.We launched our canoe into Freeland Lake were we discovered our friend the young black bear was now rambling along the shoreline looking for food.

The portage over to Killarney Lake was soon accomplished.Here we met a young couple coming out.There were a few mosquitoes here to annoy you.But we soon left them behind as we made our way into beautiful Killarney Lake.The wind was light and before you know it we were at the O S A Lake portage.Here we were met by a pair of Canada Geese with six little goslings standing on shore. The geese entered the water as we pulled in and soon disappeared up the shoreline.

The portage into OSA Lake is one of my favorites with its open stands of large Maple trees.The sun filtering down from above  through the forage to dapple the forest floor.Here you can spot tracks of whitetail deer and enjoy the wild flowers such as Johnny Jump ups.Reloading the canoe Paul and I paddled West on OSA Lake to a campsite on a large island.Before long our campsite was in place and we sat down to relax and enjoy the surroundings.Exploring the island we discovered a  number of possible compositions.With luck the wind would calm down and we could do some photographing.

That evening our wishes came true and I captured the above scene.Early Spring the deciduous leaves are a nice yellow green in color.With the darker evergreen colors along with warm light you can achieve some very nice effects.The above composition is a result of this.The rock point in the foreground adds color and depth.The bit of forage on the rocks added to the scene as well.The reflections add a nice filler to tie everything in.

Well that is it for this week.I have not had time to read everyone’s blog so I apologize for that as I am very busy.So until next time happy trails.

Close To Home.

Paul Smith and I were having a conversation one day as we were heading out on one of our adventures.Paul mentioned that I should check out Bass Lake about 10 minutes from home.This mid size lake is surrounded by broad-leafed trees that would add some very nice fall colors.

A couple weeks later my Mother drove in and asked if I would take her to Lively so she could do some banking.As we were driving I thought that I would go and check out this Bass Lake on the way back home. Returning from Lively I drove off of Highway 17 onto the Fairbanks Road.This road will take you directly to Fairbanks Provincial Park on Fairbanks Lake.When we neared  Bass Lake I noticed the far shoreline had a lot of color yet and the wind was minimal.I then decided to head home and gather up the camera gear.

Upon reaching home I called up Paul and told him That I was heading to Bass Lake for a photo shoot.Paul told me he would meet me there but would be a few minutes late.I gathered up the camera gear and Mother said she was going for a nap.I arrived at Bass Lake in short order.One thing I notice was there was heavy traffic on this road.There was also a fair amount of heavy trucks hauling on the road.

I proceeded to set the camera and tripod up on the shoulder of the road,mindful of the oncoming traffic. The lake came up to the road here so there was not much room to setup.I decided quickly to do a Pano here.There was and old building on a rock point with a door leaning on the building’s front wall.Yellow leaves highlighted by the sun  was the predominant color behind the building .Looking to the right I noticed a cottage showing through the trees.I did not want to include this cottage but saw a nice small Maple tree glowing red.That would me my right anchor.I then proceed to take four overlapping shots.I kept the shots fairly tight as to show no sky and just enough reflection to add color and detail to the composition.The water was just calm enough to create that painted effect on the colored reflections in the water.

Paul showed up about 15 minutes later.By this time lighting effect was gone.The zoom was set at 135 mm with a shutter speed of 1/13 sec @ f11. Next week I will continue with this close to home adventure as we explored around the lake.Until then happy trails

Bog Island

Small lakes and bogs can created interesting subject material.With that said Paul Smith and I have found such a location to photograph.I had previously photographed this little island before.If you go back a couple post you will see the same island.

This time I captured the island at a different angle.I set the tripod up half way down a slight incline and waited as the lighting changed.As I watched the various light beams I was also aware of the sun’s angle as it was setting to the West.It would not be long before the sun would shine into the lense.

As the sun lowered it began highlighting parts of the island shoreline and backlit the trees beautifully.I now had a problem with the sun glare in the lense.Using my ball cap to fend of the glare I captured this wonderful exposure.The lighting highlighted the reddish growth along the island shoreline.The deadheads added character to the photo with a ghostly affect. With so much light on the island the background was darker,consisting of dark green evergreens that are common to this part of the country.

This photo was taken with a zoom setting of 120 mm and the shutter at 0.4 f22.I was forced to to tight crop this shot with only a bit of reflection in the water due to the lake surface not being calm.This was another case of having to go back a number of times due to unsatisfactory conditions and just waiting.

In the end it is well worth it,so till next time,Happy Trails.