Tag Archives: Massey

Beam of Light

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Strolling along the riverbank of the Aux Sauble River, North of Massey Ontario. It was late afternoon. I saw this beam of light highlighting a clump of grass on the far shoreline. Keeping the composition tight and keeping the rocks on the left for structure. Looking behind that clump of grass there was vegetation being highlighted by the beam of light. I will also tell you that there are high hills on either side of the river. That is why you will get these beams of light in late afternoon. By evening this area will be in shadow.

The water is slowly moving here. A nice yellow reflection is cast on the river. I quickly set up my tripod and Canon 7D. In situations like this you must be quick. You do not know how long you have to get the composition. It could be a minute or ten minutes. So speed is of ultimate importance. I do not have to think how I will compose a shot. I do it automatically. Another factor when photographing along rivers like this is that the wind is not as much of a problem as opposed to being on a lake with a wide expanse of water.

Well that is it for now. Thanks for the comments and dropping by. Spring is just around the corner. Until next time happy trails.

Late Evening Sunlight

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A quiet stroll along the banks of the Aux Sauble River. The wind has died down. It is early evening. The sun is casting light through the tress on the left. A beautiful glow of yellow, green is illuminating the still waters. The tree trunks cast as black in the reflections on the water’s surface. The river narrows in the background. This is a place were you could sit on the river bank and just relaxed and enjoy the scenery. The shoreline is lined with Cedar and Pine trees.

Well that is it for this week. Until next time happy trails.

Fast Water and Rocks

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Colorful rocks and fast water make for some wonderful compositions. I purposely kept this shot tight. I just showed enough vegetation at the top to add color and a bit of framing. I chose a couple rocks for the foreground for added depth. Then I recorded different shutter speeds but left my f-stops at f22. At the pace of the water coming through here I need a shutter speed to stop the fast flowing water. This how you  can create what I call character with flowing water. You make the water come alive with power and movement. You want that water to be vibrant.

After you get home, upload your shots to the computer. Then it is just a matter of selecting the composition that turns you on and process it. I am a photo artist so my work for the most part does not look like a standard photograph.

The above scene was taken on the Aux Sauble River just North of Massey Ontario

I have just published a book at Blurb consisting of my photos and poetry. You can check it out here.

http://www.blurb.ca/b/4071212-a-widerness-experience-through-photos-and-poetry

Well that is it for now. Thank you for stopping by. Until next time Happy Trails

Making Use of Rock Structures

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A short half hour canoe ride brings you to a stretch of fast water that has some interesting photo opportunities. The location is the Aux Sauble River North of Massey Ontario. This scene was interesting in that on the West side of the river was an unique rock structure. The face of the rock was smooth and dished from constant wear by water over countless years. There is a nice overhang of Pine branches on the far shoreline. I set up my tripod and my Canon 7D to use the rock structure on the right as my lead in to the composition.

Well that is it for this week. Thanks for stopping by. Until next time happy trails.

A Unique Waterfalls

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Unique rock structure; Color and the sound of water rushing and splashing over the rocks add up to an impressive scene. McGee Falls on the Aux Sauble River North of Massey is such a place. There is not a lot to photograph here. But what there is  will delight any artist. When I was here it was a cloudy day with the hint of rain. This created even lighting and saturated colors. With the lighting good and the colors beautiful, it is time to set up.

I set my equipment up at an angle to the falls. This falls consists of a series of drops from elevation. The water flows into the scene from two different locations due to the rock cropping between the flow of water. There is so much depth here to add to the depth of the composition. There is a small plateau in the middle that the water flows over and around. The best part is the neat piece of rock sitting right on top of the plateau. It reminds me of some type of shell. Boy does this rock ever have character. The first thing you will notice about the rock formations in this composition is the many edges, shadows and color. I wanted to have rock in the foreground so I placed the river edge in front of me for that depth. This photo is about the rocks. I kept the water to a minimum, but it is still a integer part of the photo. I have water coming in on the left and exiting out on the right.

I exposed at 1.3 sec f22 with an iso of 100. At this shutter speed I was able to maintain the soft look of where it was needed, but allowed for definition of the water where required. Specifically the water that flowed off the plateau and the little falls on the left. There is just a spot of vegetation in the background to tell you that the river is in a forested area. There is enough water to tell you that over countless ages the flow of water has transformed the granite rocks to what can be seen today.

Well that is it for today. Until next time happy trails.

Rushing Water

Jan Winther and I crossed over from the Westbranch to the Tote Road North of Massey.We came on to the Massey Tote Road at the 28 mile mark.It was early afternoon as we headed South.This is a very windy and hilly road for many kilometers. Jan loves photographing waterfalls, so I figured we would check out Cameron Falls on the Aux Sauble River. I had hiked into this falls last June.I was very much disappointed when I had arrived.There was no water going over the falls at all.What a disapointment.

So with that in mind we walked into the Cameron Falls.Upon arrival we saw a fair amount of water to make it possible to get some photos.The water level was still low from previous years.Jan was sure happy though so I left him to his thing and started exploring.I have been here many times, but am always fasinated by the unique rock structure found here.There is black rock and red granite rock.Due to the running water over time has reshaped many of the rocks surfaces.

I love doing close up compositions of running water and rocks.The above photo is a typical example.By using various shutter speeds and f22 I am looking for character in the water flow.I want detail in the water and colour.Now color is obtained late in the evening as while as the rocks lose their harshness due to the bright sunlight most of the day.I also found from expierience that clear blue skys with give better effects.You will notice the water at bottom left of photo is a dark blue. This created by clear blue skys above the water.

We stayed as late as we could.But had to get out with enough light to see.I always carry a couple small flashlights in case I get carried away photographing and let the darkness creep up.

That is it for this week.So thanks for coming to visitThe tea is always on.So until next time happy trails.

Creatively With Water

One of the things I really love doing is look for patterns in running water as I walk along a river or creek.The photo above was taken at the top end of a waterfalls.For this type of shot you need fairly fast water and a bright overcast day.The water is tumbling over the rocks in three different directions here.I chose a composition at an angle to the flow so the water would exit out on the bottom left corner of the photo.So basically you have the water running in from both sides and the top.This will give you flow in and flow out.The secret here is in the shutter speed as while maintaining depth of field.

Once the camera and tripod are set up I will shot the scene at different exposures.I may take up to 20 exposures so that I can  select the photo that I will use when I get home.You want to create defining patterns with the water.Shooting at 1 sec or so will not achieve the results we are looking for as you would create water that has no detail.This photo that I selected was shot at a shutter speed of  1/4 sec at f22.You will see that the flowing water has character and depth.

As I was walking along above the river I noticed the unique patterns been created by a group of rocks in the river.The river was very low at this time of year.The water depth was very shallow.I found my way down to the river’s edge and set up the camera and tripod to create this composition.The lighting was extremely beautiful that evening and everything had a wonderful glow.

I used the rock on the left for a lead in and the water flows from the top left to the bottom right.I shot this one at 1o secs at f29.There was some very nice patterns created by the water flowing around the small rocks. Again I shot at different shutter speeds to create the patterns I wanted.

You will not see these type of effects too often,but when you do start shooting.You must also picture in your mind what it will look like in Photoshop.Until next time happy trails.

Capturing The Light

My photographic partner,Paul Smith and I unloaded the canoe in to the Aux Sauble River North of Massey at the 3 mile mark.We proceeded to paddle up river and we worked our way up to a small waterfalls and unloaded the canoe on a sandbar on the opposite shoreline.Paul elected to stay at the waterfalls and I proceeded upriver looking for photographic opportunities.Looking back down river I noticed a bit of a haze as the day was hot and muggy.

As I walked upstream I noticed a beam of sunlight highlighting the grass and ferns near the waters edge.The scene was on the opposite shore of the river.The time was getting on late afternoon and creating heavy shadows on the far shore.The sun also sets in that direction.I quickly set up and shot the scene that you see above.The dark background brings out the foreground and the reflections in the water.The dark background also helps eliminate clutter.It also helps to keep the shot tightly composed.

I photographed the composition with a zoom setting of 135 and the shutter speed at 0.6 sec and f25.

I continued walking upstream and I noticed some unique lighting ahead of me that you see in the photo above.The problem was that the background was very dark and the right shoreline was brightly lit.I set up the camera and tripod and created the composition you see above.I set the exposure for the sandbar and took a photo and then I took a exposure on the background and took a photo at that setting.This allowed me to bring both photos into Photoshop and achieve what I was looking for.

At this time it was getting late and walking further upstream was getting harder going.I had covered about a mile and a half.I retraced my steps back downstream and met Paul at the waterfalls.

We loaded the canoe and drifted back down river enjoying the stillness and quiet of the woods.Beaver were swimming ahead of  and Paul heard twiggs snapping beside us up in the bush.We stopped paddling and listened for a few moments but nothing happened.It was dark by the time we got back to the truck and headed home.

It was a great afternoon and evening enjoying the wilderness and getting a quality photo or two in the process an added bonus.As you can see I am always watching for interesting lighting situations.This only can happen if you spend a lot of time observing what is happening around you.

So until next time happy trails.

Mile 29 Aux Sauble River

Late afternoon last Thursday Paul Smith and I head up to the 42 mile mark on the Aux Sauble River North of Massey.This location has a good set of rapids which are not of much interest in photographing.The river above the rapids is quite interesting with good photographing opportunities.

We had been here the week before when there was an overcast sky and the air was heavy with moisture.As a matter fact there was a fine mist in the air that you could not see,but the mist showed up in the photos.I had a lot of unsharp photos,especially with the rocks.

This time around the problem was that we had shadow to the left and right of us and brightly lit shoreline ahead of us.There was a touch of wind that did not stop completely.Another problem we ran into was that the fish were jumping at a tiny white mayfly that probably measured about a 1/8 inch. I had seen one fly by  me close up so I was able to identify  it as a mayfly hatch.You would press the shutter and a fish would jump creating ripples in the water.

I walked out to a rock above the rapids in my chest waders  and noticed some reddish colored rocks in front of me.Looking at the far shore line I saw rocks and deadheads reflecting in the water.By combining the reddish rocks for foreground and the far shore for depth I created an  interesting composition.I set my zoom lense at 44mm and the shutter speed at 4 sec and the f stops at f25.

Once we lost our lightning we packed up and headed back down the road.We decided to take the crossover road that connects the Tote Road to the Westbranch Road North of Webbwood. This road is used by loggers to get in to the area to cut trees and haul the logs to the sawmill.Paul and I were driving along when we drove down a small hill and before us was a swampy area with blackish water by the road.What caught our eye was a group of deadheads on the far side with reddish orange grass behind them.The water was dead calm and the lighting was gorgeous.We parked the truck and proceeded to photograph and low and behold we again had problems with fish jumping.

The above photo was one of the compositions that I came up with.Shot with a zoom setting of 65 mm and a shutter speed of 3.2 sec @ f22.One of the things that I had to watch out for was there was a lot of gray in the background that would not look good.The lightning lasted about a half an hour,before we headed home.

So until next time happy trails.

The Artist in The Photographer

A good friend of mine,Carole Spandau made a comment last week that I had the heart of a true poet,your work is so personal,very heartfelt and very moving stuff.This got me thinking about the artist in the photographer.

Carole Spandau’s work is recognized nationally and internationally for her paintings of Montreal Quebec.

To view her work check out her site at FAA

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/carole-spandau.html

As a photographer we are controlled by the weather conditions and the time of day.Luck also plays a big role in our work.We must be able to recognize a good shot when it happens,as Nature is very fleeting when it comes to lighting and shadows.

The above photo emphasizes my point.As I was walking back along the river I saw the light highlighting the greenery on the point in the river.By using the dark background to enhance the lighted point and the yellow reflection on the left side to lead the eye I created a composition very pleasing in an artistic way.You will also noticed the sunlight is highlighting the river bottom to give contrast to the darker areas in the water.

This photo was taken very late in the afternoon at a shutter speed  of 0.5 sec ,f22.The zoom lense was set at 75 mm.

The artist in the photographer is when you take the components of what you see before you and create an exciting work of art.Learn to recognize a good composition when you come upon it and then be able to be creative when you compose that shot.So until next time happy trails.