Tag Archives: Early Morning Sunlight

AY Jackson Lake

AY Jackson Lake

Killarney Provincial Park

This is a favorite lake that I enjoyed exploring

Many a early morning I walked into this lake to photograph

Some days I was awarded for my efforts

Some days not so lucky

Shakwa Lake

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With a 3 hour drive over logging roads behind us a dream was realized. For me it has been at least 40 years that I had been on Shakwa Lake. For my partner Ron Sirkka it has been 7 years. With great anticipation we loaded the boat. The boat we were using was Ron’s 14 foot aluminum. With a strong north wind at our back, Ron headed for the first narrows. High on a hill stood the fire tower. The first sign of change was low water in these narrows and abundance of weeds. We slowly steered the boat through the deeper water. Then came an old beaver dam with very little water over it. Jumping overboard we dragged the boat over with little difficulty. Both of us now had wet feet. Oh well. Moving on through the channel brought us to another obstacle. Small stones with an inch of water flowing over. Ron suggested gathering pieces of wood to use as rollers. Ron and I dragged the boat over the improvised rollers into deeper water. I ended up to my waist in water at one point. Finally we were clear of the channel. Moving on brought us to the next channel.

The next channel was easier to negotiate. Ron had to clean off the propeller a number of times. The weeds would foul up on the prop. Forty years ago there was a lot more water in these channels. Using paddles to make quick adjustments in direction, we were through. The last channel was filled with stumps hence known as stump narrows. I had to get out of boat to get through a number of spots. The boat was soon moving through open water.

Shakwa Lake is a long narrow lake opening into larger bodies of water. It has quite a number of islands spread out over its length. Surrounded by dense forest and hills. A very scenic location. Home to the Lake Trout. Ron soon had his fishing rod rigged up for trolling and in the water. It was not but five minutes later I heard fish on. Oh boy, the net was still packed away. As I rummaged through my pack for the net, Ron proceeded to lose the fish. I finally got the net ready in case of another hooked fish.

Our campsite was soon at hand. Landing the boat, we soon had the camp gear unloaded. I held off from setting up the tent with the strong blowing wind. I decided to wait until later. I suggested that we eat supper. Ron was happy with that. Ron’s homemade stable was still in place from seven years before. With a full belly of spaghetti, launching the boat, we were soon trolling for lake trout. Our catch that evening was three lake trout between 1.5 to 2 pounds.

We returned to the campsite with the wind blowing steady. We set up the tents quickly. It was time for bed. The sun was down and the wind blowing strong. That north wind blew all night long and never let up. As a matter of fact it blew steady the whole four days we were there. The only difference was it finally swung to the south. It was a cold night with morning being quite cool for July. There was a mist on the water that morning. Though the photography was scarce, I did manage to get a few shots that morning. Using Turtle Rock as my main subject, I captured some wonderful lighting that was golden in color. You can see the tip of an island to the left. This added depth to the photo with the tree covered  shoreline in the background.

Once I had finished photographing it was time for breakfast. Ron who is a very experienced cook when it comes to fish.He was appointed the job by yours truly. I soon had the coffee boiling. Ron and I soon were sitting in our camp chairs sipping hot coffee and eating the so awesome cooked trout. Nothing like fresh fish cooked to perfection.

That was the only morning that I would be able to photograph. So until next time happy trails. Oh, before I forget The Killarney Art Show runs this coming weekend. Do yourself a favor and check it out. While you are there indulge in the famous fish and chips at Herbies.

http://www.killarneyartshow.com/the-details.html

 

The Essence Of Light

Lake

 

The Essence of Light
The essence of light is very important to the final composition of a piece of art work. Whether it is the cool light of dawn to the warm light of evening. Cloudy days create its own nuances of lighting. But in order to observe these various light patterns, you must sit and observe. Remember also that the sun rises in the East and settles in the West.
As one awaits the coming of dawn the surrounding landscape is cast in darkness. From were I stand the sun will rise behind me to my right. With the coming of the sun a brightness begins to occur over the land, but very subtly. Just imagine a scene of a lake surrounded by hills. An island is in the middle background. The sun does not burst from the horizon. Other factors come into play. These would be hills and trees that block the sun’s ray’s path. Quite suddenly a small patch of light will appear on the far hill in the background. The background hills are the highest of the surrounding landscape. As you watch the patch of light evolves, spreading over the hill. Then off to the right, another patch of light appears. Very slowly spreading, with the ascent of the morning sun. The shorelines of the lake and island are still in deep shadow.
The sky is getting brighter now, but still having the light intensity of the surrounding area. With the edging of the sun up on the horizon, the background hills are losing more shadows. Then a glimpse of light appears on the near hills to my left. These are the hills that cascade down to the lake shore. Now we are getting into some composition possibilities. The glow of light upon a tree to my left reflecting into the water with a dark background creating contrast. The right shoreline is now receiving sunlight filtering through the trees to highlight the top edge of the trees. There are still dark shadows in the scene.
You must also realize the angle of your scene in relation to the path of the sun’s rays and the angle of the light that is low at this time in the morning. Go into a dark room with a small light of some sort. Maybe a candle. Place it at a comfortable height. Take a three dimensional object. Place it in the palm of your hand. Hold it off center horizontally to the source of light. Now observe what is receiving light and what is remaining in shadow. Now turn your object slightly and observe the change in light and shadow. Keep experimenting with this and I think your understanding of lighting with be better.
Back to our scene now. The hills in the background are now alight from the sunlight. The sun is still filtering through the trees to touch upon our described scene. The shadows are becoming less. Let us look at the island now. The left top edge of this island is receiving some sunlight. The evergreens on the left side of the island are edged in light at their tops. The right part of the island still in shadow. You will now observe the reflection of light on the waters surface. The shorelines are becoming more light enhanced as the sun continues to advance. There are now only small pockets of shadow to be found as the sun clears the obstacles before it. The advancing sunlight is slowly engulfing the island. The sky in the background is more intense highlight than the landscape. Before long the entire scene before you is now bright. As an artist you will want to capture the scene before it reaches that intensity. To me, when everything is well lit up, it has lost its appeal.
The end of the day is in reverse. You start out with a bright scene. We are not talking about sunsets here. It is the relationship of the setting of the sun to the landscape. Again I am placing the sun behind me for this discussion. Same scene as above. The sky in the background continues to darken. The shorelines of the lake are beginning to fall into shadow. The left side of the lake may be in shadow, while the right shoreline is still receiving light. As the sun descends to the horizon, you will observe some ugly shadow patterns of shadows. This could be in the form of straight line of shadow on the trees edging the lake’s shoreline. This does not look good. Always remember that as the sun lowers, hills and tree line alter the path of sunlight. This occurs both morning and evening. Thus the weird shadow patterns occur twice each day, morning and more predominantly in the evening. Once the sun has dropped below the horizon the lighting becomes quite even. There is a short period now to create your composition before total darkness comes.
The lighting of daytime is replaced by a magic lighting whereby the colors will take on a glow of their own. Rock structures become alive in color. It is an experience worth seeing. The wind normally becomes still, thus creating wonderful reflections upon the water. The magical moment. There are other forms of lighting such as side lighting and back lighting. I have used this type of lighting to great effect. Cloudy days give you their own unique lighting. The colors become saturated and there are no shadows. Now unique compositions can be had when there is a break in the clouds and sunlight enhances certain parts of your composition. This truly can be effective.
Whether morning sunrise or evening sunsets, both can give you an assortment of color in the sky. The colors will range from magenta, pink, red and purple. At times I have had the evening sun cast various colors on my rocky shoreline scenes. Thus an exotic scene is created. Just a matter of being there.
I hope I have created a better understanding of lighting on landscapes. Until next time happy trails!
Ken Bennison

Sitting on a Moss Covered Rock

Superior_2064

 

 

 

 

Sitting on a moss covered rock

Surrounded by Black Spruce

Squashing a skeet now and then

The pesky critters would dive-bomb

To sting the back of my neck

 

A well beaten moose trail

Traverses the swamp edge

A scene of stillness

The open water quiet and benign

The ghostly dance of mist

Transforms the summer morning

 

The sun not yet risen

A channel leads one’s eye

To the far hills

The Black Spruce dark and ominous

At the shore’s edge

Protruding rocks break the shoreline

A cliff rises in the channel

 

The sun’s rays slowly creep

Over the shadowed land

Light filters through the mist

The far hills unfold

In the morning light

Fingers of light creep

Through the dark shadows

 

The mist is still swirling

A pair of Loons appear

Dark shapes in the mist

The warmth of the morning sunlight

Chasing the night shadows before it

The mist now dissipating

Exposing the Boreal Forest

 

Rising from my moss covered  rock

I quietly trudged  up the hill

With one last look

As I crested the hill

Another memory to preserve